Asian & Moroccan Fusion Edamame beans with preserved lemons and olives

Apr 28th, 2016
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Because of the large amount of protein, Soybeans have historically been called “meat of the field” or “meat without bones.”

  • Rich in Vitamins A and C.
  • Great source of Calcium, Iron and fiber.
  • Preserved or fermented lemons are soft and the whole fruit becomes edible, which is an excellent source of probiotics.

Ingredients

1 generous cup of fresh or edamame beans, 1 preserved lemon, 2 cloves of garlic crushed, handful fresh chopped cilantro, 1tbsp capsicum paste, couple olives, 1tbsp olive oil, salt and 2 cups of warm water.

Directions

  • In a saucepan, over medium heat, put and stir together olive oil, ½ preserved lemon thinly sliced, garlic, fresh cilantro, capsicum paste and salt.
  • Add water and take to a boil for 10 to 15’, then add edamame beans. Bring to a quick boil then reduce the heat to low setting and cook for 20’.
  • Arrange the warm dish in a serving plate, place the remaining ½ lemon preserved thickly sliced and the olives.

How to make capsicum paste always handy

  • Wash and dice 2 or more capsicums put them in a blender to become smooth.
  • Place the mixture in a pan over medium heat until all the water is evaporated.
  • Let it cool off in room temperature and divide the mixture in an ice cube tray and freeze.
  • Then take the frozen capsicum cubes out the tray and place them in a Ziploc or container in the freezer. When needed take 1 cube at a time.

How to make preserved lemons

  • Wash and pat dry the desired quantity of lemons. Cut vertically both ends of the lemon ¼ of the way though the fruit and fill up both ends with sea salt.
  • Stuff the lemons into a Mason jar and store it in a dark and dry place for 1 month. The lemons will release their juice, no need to add water.
  • After 1 month, it is ready, put the jar in the refrigerator to stop the fermentation.

To read the full article please download our Asana Journal App or purchase Issue 160 April 2016

Mouna

Bio

Mouna is a 200-hours Yoga Alliance registered teacher who also completed 200-hours Advanced Hatha Yoga Teacher Training with Master Yogananth. Mouna is an active member of Andiappan Yoga Community, teaching yoga to domestic helpers. Native of Morocco, Mouna has been immerged from a very young age in her rich traditional cuisine influenced by Berber, Moorish and Arab neighbors. Her mother, a fine cook continues the family traditions of distilling orange blossom, making olive oil, and preserved lemons. Mouna is passionate about simple, healthy and fusion homemade food recipes.

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